Job Seekers: How NOT to Treat a Recruiter

Job Seekers: How NOT to Treat a Recruiter

Currently applying for jobs through recruiters? Here are our top five mistakes you need to avoid!

1. Underestimate Their Role:
Think recruiters are just there to pass on your CV and act as the go-between between you and the employer? Think again! Recruiters are basically the first point of contact for the job – it’s up to them to determine your suitability for the role – so it’s fair to say you have to impress them. In other words, you need to treat them with the same respect you would the employer. Fail to do so, and there’s a pretty strong chance that you won’t be put forward for the role.

And even if you do get put forward, there’s a chance your bad attitude could still screw things up. Think about it; the employer obviously trusts the recruiter’s opinion, so even if your CV is amazing, if the recruiter says that you’re not a nice person to deal with, there’s a chance the end-employer might end up dismissing your application because they think you’re the not the type of person they want to employ! Be warned!

2. Bug Them Relentlessly:
Recruiters are really busy people. 99% of the time they have countless roles to recruit for at the same time which means they’ve got to sort through potentially hundreds of applications and set up countless interviews each week. The result? You may not always be at the top of their list of people to contact… but that doesn’t mean you’re not on the list at all!
Just to clarify; we’re not saying don’t keep in touch… but there’s really no need to call or email Every. Single. Day! 🙂

3. Demand You Be Put Forward For The Role:
Remember how we said you need to be polite and treat recruiters with respect in point one? Well, that applies to your application too! We agree that it’s good to be confident and forthright with recruiters… but be careful not to cross the line.

By all means, be persuasive when discussing your suitability for the role – but never demand to be put forward for a role if the recruiter doesn’t feel you’re suitable. Yes, you might think you’d be perfect – but remember, the recruiter probably knows a lot more about the role than you do so you need to respect their opinion.

4. Not Be Willing To Discuss Your Application:
Following on from point three, we understand that when you’re applying for jobs you want the process to be as quick and painless as possible but you still need to make time to discuss your application with the recruiter. We don’t mean to harp on, but at the end of the day, it’s a recruiter’s job to find the best candidate for the role and it’s their reputation at stake – so you can understand why they want to find out as much as they can about each candidate before they put them forward.

All we’re saying is it’s definitely worth trying to find a few spare minutes to discuss your application with the recruiter – because even if you don’t end up getting that role, at least they’ll have a good idea of who you are and what your skills are so can bear you in mind for future vacancies. Oh, and while we’re on the subject – if you do arrange a call, try your best to make it – and if you can’t, try your best to let them know! Remember, it’s all about making the best impression possible!

5. Throw A Tantrum When You Don’t Get The Job:
No one likes to be told ‘no’ and hear criticism but it’s important to try and keep your emotions in check, particularly when the recruiter is trying to offer constructive criticism about your application or interview performance. It’s like we just said in point four – you never know when another suitable role might turn up with that recruiter – so you need to make sure you don’t give them a reason to discount you in the future!

Source: Business2Community

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